#teddyartist: Günter Papendell

His amazing voice held audiences spellbound in Mannheim, Bremen and even Chicago: Baritone Günter Papendell has already made his mark across a wide range. Winner and finalist in various competitions – including the ARD Channel Music Contest, the Willi Domgraff Fassbaender Competition and the Belvedere Singing Contest. In 2004, he joined the ensemble at the Musiktheater im Revier, Gelsenkirchen. Guest performances have taken him to the Bavarian State Opera House and the Gärtnerplatz Theater in Munich, to the Mannheim and Weimar National Theaters as well as the State Theaters at Nüremburg and Mainz. He has been part of the ensemble at the Komische Oper Berlin since 2007, where he has played Don Giovanni, Escamillo, Guglielmo, Graf Almaviva and Dr. Falke.

When: 14.02.14
9 pm @TEDDY AWARD Gala
Where: Komische Oper Berlin
Ticket Hotline: Tel.: +49-(0)30-4799 7474

Picture © Gunnar Geller

#teddyartist: Whipstick

Two absolute luminaries of their respective artistic genres present a collaborative show full of music, passion, acrobatics, comedy and sensuality. David Pereira‘s acrobatics give rise to impassioned performances in the air and on the ground. Physicality, dance, acrobatics and passion unite in a perfect GesamtkunstwerkJack Woodhead is a reincarnation of the cabaret in modern attire. With flawless piano playing and grandiose singing, he always manages to walk the fine line between loud, funny, trashy tones and calm poetics. Pereira and Woodhead met at BASE BERLIN and have been working together on various shows ever since. The two artists together in one show guarantees a completely new path in the chanson and varieté scene.

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When: 14.02.14
11.45 pm @TEDDY AWARD Midnight Special
Where: Komische Oper Berlin
Ticket Hotline: Tel.: +49-(0)30-4799 7474

#teddyartist: Dagmar Manzel

Whether it’s on the stage, in the cinema or on television, Dagmar Manzel is on the scene. Born in Berlin and trained at the Ernst Busch School of Acting Berlin, Manzel is one of Germany’s top actresses. From 1980 to 1983, she worked at the Staatsschauspiel (State Theater) Dresden and from 1983 to 2001, she was part of the ensemble at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. Since then, she has been a freelance actress and singer. Her tour MENSCHENsKIND kicks off at the Komischen Oper Berlin in February 2014. Following the stage show, she is slated to star as Head Commissioner in Germany’s favorite crime series, Tatort (Franken edition). Dagmar Manzel can do it all!

When: 14.02.14
9 pm @TEDDY AWARD Gala
Where: Komische Oper Berlin
Ticket Hotline: Tel.: +49-(0)30-4799 7474

Picture © Philip Glaser / Deutsche Grammophon

Oversittings

If you create a blog for an international film festival, you also want a lot of people from all over the world to understand what you write about the movies, the events and the artists. German, even if it is the biggest language in the European Union by the number of mother tongue speakers, can only reach a limited amount of world’s population.  By now English has become the Lingua franca in international business, so that normally every text only needs to be translated into one language. That makes a lot of things easier.

At the same time you should never underestimate the vagaries of translating, because very easily you can get into unexpected troubles. For example a friend of mine was asked not to long ago in Sweden, if he knew the Swedish national anthem: “Ja, jag vill leva, jag vill dö i norden…” (Yes, I want to live, I want to die in the north…). For sure he learned this sentence before he went on the journey and so he said yes and said: “Jag vill leva, jag vill döda här i norden…” which sounds quite similar, but unfortunately it meant something rather different: I want to live, I want to kill here in the north. Later he told me, he didn’t succeed in making any friends during his trip.

Worse, it seems somehow, is the situation in Denmark though, where even Danes among each other hardly manage to communicate. But here we didn’t want to talk about translations from German to Swedish or from Danish to Danish, but about transferring German texts into English. Also this can be quite difficult: So, what do you do, if it makes total sense to a German if an acrobat makes a double screw in the air? A double twist sounds rather unfamiliar for the German ear. Also the “playjoy” of an actress who enjoys being on stage might be misleading. Some Germans would even ask the Dear Mr. Singingclub for some help.

And the other way around? How do you translate for example ‘queer’ into German? Do you use the German word for dizzy? Or even “to be spoiled”? Unexpected associations might appear in the reader’s mind. And what about “straight“? Maybe you could use the German word for “even“ or “smooth“? But also that could be misleading. Or, as a friend of mine suggested: “Just write boring! It’s the same anyways.“ Well, a German would say that she just wanted to take someone on her arm – instead of pulling a leg –, but on our blog this would be rather politically incorrect – then I wouldn’t be allowed to write anymore and all that would be left for me to say, would be: There we have the salad. So, I guess, I will simply stay lost in translation with my oversittings.

Up to now almost,
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